Stunting Tips 2

Stunting Tips 2

Secrets of Control Line Flying
By Brodak Manufacturing & Dist. Co., Inc.




6. OUTSIDE LOOP

Fly the model into an inverted position. With the wind at your back and the airplane at low altitude, apply down-control at point 1. This will cause the model to climb out of an inverted position to point 2; immediately apply FULL down-control and the model will complete the loop sharply at point 3. Bring the controls to the neutral position and the model will return to inverted level flight. The loop is completed at high altitude. Fly the model down to the desired level. Do not attempt more than five loops without untwisting the lines. Practice making the diameter of the loops larger and larger by applying down-control less and less sharply at point 2. When the outside loop is mastered, you should enter and leave the perfect loop from the same altitude in a nice smooth round pattern as shown by the dotted lines.



7. HORIZONTAL EIGHT


Horizontal eight is actually an inside loop and outside loop combined. From level flight, and with the wind at your back, apply up-control at point 1, similar to making an inside loop. At point 2, apply down control until the model goes into an outside loop. Complete the outside loop returning to point 2 and apply up-control to complete the inside loop to point 1. Neutralize the controls to return the model to level flight.



8. OVERHEAD EIGHT


From level flight, and with the wind at your back, apply up-control at point 1 so that the model climbs in the same manner as at the start of a wide inside loop. At the top of the loop the model is almost directly overhead at point 2. At this point apply down-control slowly so that the model straightens out and reverses its flight path. Hold the control in the down position until the model finishes the circle and is once again overhead at point 2. Apply up-control at point 2, slowly so that the model eases in the last half of the circle to complete the figure eight at point 3, maneuver as shown. Neutralize the controls to return the model to level flight.




Problems

SIMPLE AS THIS CONTROL SYSTEM IS, PROBLEMS CAN CREEP IN IF WE ARE NOT CAREFUL. TROUBLE SPOTS ARE NUMBERED ON THE LAYOUT SKETCH.

1. THE CONTROL HANDLE SHOULD BE ADJUSTABLE SO THAT IT MAY BE SET FOR NEUTRAL ELEVATOR ON ANY MODEL.

2. FLEXIBLE STEEL CABLE HANDLE LEADOUTS ARE ADVISED. BRONZE CABLE, CATGUT, FISHLINE, ETC. WILL BREAK UNDER STRESS.

3. WEAK CONNECTORS ARE DANGEROUS. PULL TEST TO AVOID ACCIDENTS.

4. DO NOT USE THINNER WIRE THAN RECOMMENDED FOR YOUR ENGINE.

5. LINES MUST BE FREE OF KINKS.

6. LINES SHOULD BE THE CORRECT LENGTH.

7. ALL WIRE CONNECTIONS SHOULD BE SLIP-PROOF, SOLDERLESS AND WRAPPED.

8. LINE GUIDES ON THE WING MUST NOT HIT CONNECTORS, OR CHAFE ON LINES. NO LINE GUIDE IS NEEDED IF THE LINES RUN THROUGH THE WING.

9. THE WIRE CONNECTION AT THE BELLCRANK MUST NOT SNAG ON THE FUSELAGE SIDE, OR LIMIT THE BELLCRANK MOVEMENT.

10 IN LARGE OR HIGH POWERED MODELS, A BEARING IS ADVISED AT THE PIVOT. ANCHOR THE PIVOT BOLT MOUNT TO MOTOR MOUNTS FOR SAFETY.

11. SOLDER NUTS TO PREVENT LOOSENING.

12. IF LESS MOVEMENT OF THE ELEVATORS IS DESIRED, USE THE PUSHROD TRAINING HOLES (NEARER PIVOT) IN THE BELLCRANK.

13. USE THE LARGEST BELLCRANK POSSIBLE.

14. FRICTION, COUPLED WITH AIR PRESSURE, TEND TO “BOW” THE PUSHROD. THAT CAN WRECK YOUR MODEL. SUPPORT THE PUSHROD IN THE CENTER WITH A GUIDE.

15. THE ELEVATOR HORN (AS SHOULD ALL CONNECTIONS) MUST FORM A SNUG FIT WITH THE PUSHROD TO PREVENT PLAY.

16. THE CROSS-BAR (CONNECTING ELEVATORS) MUST BE STRONG AND WARP RESISTANT. USE HARDWOOD OR PIANO WIRE.

17. HINGES MUST BE RUGGED, FUEL-PROOF, WARP-PROOF, UNAFFECTED BY VIBRATION AND FRICTION-FREE.