Secrets of Control Line Flying

Secrets of Control Line Flying
By Brodak Manufacturing & Dist. Co., Inc.







Pre-Flight Instructions

Before attempting their first control-line flights, beginners in control-line flying must practice turning around counter-clockwise (model is flown in that direction) until he or she can accomplish turning without becoming unduly dizzy. If you will practice turning around about 20 or 30 turns at a time, for a day or two, you will find that the dizziness subsides and you will be able to turn with the model and keep yourself and the airplane under full control at all times. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT! Dizziness may cause you to lose control which will result in a severe crash. If at all possible, secure the help of an experienced control-line flyer.

YOUR FIRST FLIGHT should be made on a calm day. Do not fly on windy days since wind may blow the airplane towards you, causing lines to go slack. This will cause a crash since lines must be taut in order to maintain control. You will need a helper to fly your model. Since the lines ofyour model are long, the model will make a large circle while flying. It would be best, therefore, to secure a flying site which is level and free from all obstructions, such as school yards or parking lots.

BE CERTAIN THERE ARE NO ELECTRIC WIRES OF ANY KIND ON YOUR FLYING SITE.

Mark off the center with a white cloth or something similar to be sure center is clearly visible at all times. With the flyer holding the handle, the helper should walk the model around the circle counter-clockwise with the lines fully extended to be certain of a clear flight path. Place the airplane so that the lines are fully extended with the handle in the center of the circle and any prevailing wind blowing from the rear of the airplane as shown with arrow. Now walk from the model to the control handle with one line in each hand to be certain that lines are separated and not tangled. Carefully examine the sketches showing how different positionsof the handle make corresponding changes in the position of the elevator which controls your flying.

Note: ALL MOTIONS MUST BE MADE BY PIVOTING YOUR ELBOW AND NOT BY BENDING THE WRIST!

This will result in smooth flying and maneuvering. Test the control movement while your helper holds the airplane so that the lines are taut. Practice them so that you will become familiar with the “feel” and get used to the fact that your wrist remains rigid and all movement comes from pivoting at the elbow. Notice that when you tilt the handle up towards you, the top line pulls the elevator up, which will cause the model to climb. When you tilt the handle away from you, the bottom line pulls the elevator down, causing model to descend. When the handle is vertical, the elevator is in flat neutral position, and model will fly level.